Tax Rates, Exemptions, & Deductions

Who Should File?

You should file a Mississippi Income Tax Return if any of the following statements apply to you:

  • You have Mississippi Income Tax withheld from your wages.
  • You are a Non-Resident or Part-Year Resident with income taxed by Mississippi.
  • You are a Mississippi resident employed in a foreign country on a temporary or transitory basis. Your total gross income is subject to Mississippi Income tax.
  • You are a Mississippi resident working out of state (employee of interstate carriers, construction worker, salesman, offshore worker, etc.). You must file a Mississippi Resident return and report total gross income, regardless of the source.
  • You are a single resident and have gross income in excess of $8,300 plus $1500 for each dependent.
  • You are a married resident and you and your spouse have gross income in excess of $16,000 plus $1500 for each dependent.
  • You are a minor having gross income in excess of $8,300.
  • You are the survivor or representative of a deceased taxpayer. You must file a return for the taxpayer who died during the tax year or before the return was filed. A return for the deceased taxpayer should be filed on the form which would have been appropriate had he or she lived. Enter the word "deceased" and the date of death after the decedent's name on the return.

Exemptions

Mississippi allows certain exemption amounts depending upon your filing status and other criteria. Below is listed a chart of all the exemptions allowed for Mississippi Income tax.

Married Filing Joint or Combined*​​ $12,000
Married Spouse Deceased $12,000
Married Filing Separate* $ 6,000 (exactly 1/2 of the $12,000)
Head of Family $ 8,000 (with at least 1 dependent)
Single $ 6,000
Dependent, other than self or spouse**      $ 1,500
Taxpayer over 65 $ 1,500
Spouse over 65 $ 1,500
Taxpayer blind $ 1,500
Spouse blind $ 1,500

*For Married Filing Joint or Combined returns, the exemption amount may be divided between the spouses in any matter they choose. For Married Filing Separate, any unused portion of the $6,000 exemption amount by one spouse on his/her separate return cannot be used by the other spouse on his/her separate return.

**For each dependent claimed, you must provide the name, social security number and relationship of that dependent to you. A dependent is a relative or other person who qualifies for federal income tax purposes as a dependent of the taxpayer. A dependency exemption is not authorized for yourself or your spouse. If you have filed as Head of Family, you must have at least one qualifying dependent listed.

Deductions

You may choose to either itemize individual non-business deductions or claim the standard deduction for your filing status, whichever provides the greater tax benefit. Mississippi allows you to use the same itemized deductions for state income tax purposes as you use for federal income tax purposes with one exception: Mississippi Income Taxes are not deductible on your itemized deduction schedule requiring that an adjustment be made for that exception. Mississippi does allow certain deduction amounts depending upon your filing status. Below is listed a chart of all the exemptions allowed for Mississippi Income Tax.

Married Filing Joint or Combined               $ 4,600
Married Spouse Deceased $ 4,60​0
Married Filing Separate $ 2,300 (exactly 1/2 of the $4,600)
Head of Family $ 3,400
Single $ 2,300

For Married Filing Joint or Combined returns, the $4,600 standard deduction amount or the itemized deduction amount may be divided between the spouses in any matter they choose. For Married Filing Separate, any unused portion of the $2,300 standard deduction amount by one spouse on his/her separate return cannot be used by the other spouse on his/her separate return.

Tax Rates

Mississippi has a graduated tax rate. These rates are the same for individuals and businesses. There is no tax schedule for Mississippi income taxes. If you are looking to determine how much withholding should be taken out of your paycheck, look under Withholding Tax at the Withholding Tax Table. That should give you the information you are looking for.

The graduated income tax rate is:

3% on the first $5,000 of taxable income.​

4% on the next $5,000 of taxable income.

5% on all taxable income over $10,000.

​If filing a combined return (both spouses work), each spouse can calculate their tax liability separately and add the results.

Example:

John is single and has taxable income of $23,000. His tax liability will be:

​$5,000 X 3% = $150

$5,000 X 4% = $200

​$13,000 X 5% = $650

Total Tax Liability $1,000

​John marries Mary who also has taxable income of $20,000. Their tax liability will be:

Taxpayer Spouse Total Tax Rate Tax Liability

​$5000 + $5000 = $10,000 X 3% = $ 300

$5000 + $5000 = $10,000 X 4% = $ 400

​$13,000 + $10,000 = $23,000 X 5% = $1,150

Total Tax Liability = $1,850​